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Is Anesthesia a Bad Idea for My Elderly Dog? Dogs and Dental Pt. 1

Is Anesthesia a Bad Idea for My Elderly Dog? Dogs and Dental Pt. 1

Some of the most commonly asked questions at our Vancouver vet clinic are about anesthesia for older dogs, especially when it comes to COHAT, dental procedures done while your pet is unconscious.

 

Advanced Periodontitis, really bad inflammation or swelling of the gums and areas around teeth, pops up most often in older dogs. To treat this, anesthesia is very necessary and can present a major reservation to many owners with their elderly dogs

“Age,” as WebMD’s Dr. Jones said, “is not a disease, and senior citizen dogs that are otherwise healthy are generally able to tolerate anesthesia for an elective procedure. Even though anesthesia safety will continue to improve, there will never be a time when there is no risk. The question is really whether the level of risk is appropriately measured against the damage to the dog’s quality of life if it does not have a dental procedure.”

 

As well, the veterinary practice standard of today is considerably higher and safer than it was 10 or 15 years ago- the anesthetics are safer and monitoring your pet during anesthesia is much more nuanced and effective as well. As well, using intravenous fluids that are warmed up before hand and the multitude of blood tests we perform before the surgery reduces the risk of surgery dramatically.

If you have any questions, be sure to stop by our Vancouver veterinary clinic to speak with our knowledgeable vet, or to inquire about our other services such as house calls, laser therapy, or dental procedures.

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How Bad is Chocolate Poisoning for My Cat?

How Bad is Chocolate Poisoning for My Cat?

Very.

Though to a much lesser degree than their canine counterparts, cats can be very curious about human foods and try their hand at them. One of the worst things they could have is chocolate: petMD and Petful go into the science of it, if you’re curious.

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine, which isn’t naturally broken down by cats’ systems the way it is with humans. It affects the heart and nervous system, and becomes increasingly toxic as the chocolate gets darker. If your kitty just has one or two Hershey’s Kisses or the like, they can jus have their stomach pumped and be OK, but large amounts are definite medical emergencies.

If you have any questions, be sure to stop by our Vancouver veterinary clinic to speak with our knowledgeable vet, or to inquire about our other services such as house calls, laser therapy, or dental procedures.

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Should My Cat Wear Clothing?

Should My Cat Wear Clothing?

It’s getting cold in Vancouver so the only logical way to protect your cat against mother nature is to make her wear a stuffy coat right?

Nope. the vast majority of the time, a cat’s fur keeps heat in and drives cold out remarkably well, especially for an indoor cat. Before analyzing why this is the case, it’s important to note important exceptions: hairless breeds like Sphinx cats, or cats that have been shaved for surgery- they may need clothing to keep warm, according to the ASPCA (Animal Poison Control Centre).

If you do end up putting garments on your cat, be sure to go slowly and exercise caution. “Go slowly and start with short periods of time with rewards like petting or treats, so they have a positive association with the clothing,” advises Dr. Wismer of the ASPCA. “As they get used to it, you can leave it on them for longer periods of time, always with positive reinforcement.”

cat-hanger

Be sure to observe your cat’s behaviour once you clothe them- there are telling signs of discomfort like vacantly scratching, seeming frozen in place, and hiding. Also, it’s very important that your cat’s clothing doesn’t impair their ability to see or jump around or move in general. Once you start to see discomfort, undress your cat- it’s not worth it.

 

 

 

If you have any questions, be sure to stop by our Vancouver veterinary clinic to speak with our knowledgeable vet, or to inquire about our other services such as house calls, laser therapy, or dental procedures.

 

 

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Kitten Adoption Protocol At Market Hill

Kitten Adoption Protocol At Market Hill

One of the services we provide in our Vancouver veterinary clinic here at Market Hill is kitten adoption! Working closely with an organization called Action For Animals In Distress, a “registered non-profit, no-kill society dedicated to rescuing, rehabilitating and caring for abandoned and unwanted cats and small animals.” Similar to the BCSPCA, their mission is to find homes for abandoned animals or those who need them.

One of the kittens adopted early September

 

Enter our clinic! Partnering with the organization, we nurse young or newborn kittens until they are old enough to be adopted, then allow interested clients to fill out an information form with their background if they are interested in adopting. The team and doctor then reviews the applications and decides who is the best fit for these furry friends!

 

 

Here are the rates for feline adoption at Market Hill Animal Hospital, at our rainy Vancouver False Creek location:

IMG_5351Male Kitten: $235

Female Kitten: $295

Adult (Typically mother) Cat: $295

 

 

 

If you have any questions, be sure to stop by our Vancouver veterinary clinic to speak with our knowledgeable vet, or to inquire about our other services such as house calls, laser therapy, or dental procedures.

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Tick Basics: A Brief Guide

Tick Basics: A Brief Guide

12. Are Ticks Becoming More Common in Canada?

It’s definitely hard to say! There is a huge variance between tick species, but in the aggregate, cases of tick infestation has been increasing. Also, the geographic range in which tick bites have been reported is growing as well. Maybe this is due to the fact that more people are aware and observant about tick sightings, have easier ways of reporting sightings (through the internet), or the actual tick population is growing.

14. What measures should be taken to minimize the risk of dogs contracting tick borne disease in Canada?


There’s a pretty low risk of your pet catching tick borne diseases in Canada as a whole, but due to the nature in Vancouver and the rest of BC, we are definitely at a higher risk. Here are a couple good guidelines for avoiding ticks, courtesy of the Guidelines for the Treatment of Parasites in Dogs and Cats.

• Avoid tick infested areas including overgrown grass and brush in yards

• Check for ticks on skin after being in tick infested areas. A daily body inspection and prompt removal (e.g. within 18 to 24 hours) can reduce the risk of infection. To remove a tick, use tweezers to grasp its head and mouth parts as close to the skin as possible. Pull slowly until the tick is removed. Do not twist or rotate the tick and try not to damage or crush it during removal. After removing the ticks, wash the site of attachment with soap and water or disinfect it with alcohol or household antiseptic.

• Use a tick control product on dogs to minimize infestation by preventing attachment of the ticks or by killing them shortly after they begin feeding on the animal.

Veterinarians are encouraged to review the regional data included with the Guidelines for the Treatment of Parasites in Dogs and Cats for additional information.

15. What can we expect from tick treatment products?

Products generally require monthly usage. However, they do not always provide 100% protection for the entire month and may need to be applied more frequently to maintain e cacy in areas where ticks are plentiful. Pet owners should also be advised that they may see a low number of ticks on an animal even after treatment, particularly at the end of the month. We carry a number of parasite control medications, including Revolution and Advantage. Come to our Vancouver vet clinic to see which is right for your pet!

 

If you have any questions, be sure to stop by our Vancouver veterinary clinic to speak with our knowledgeable vet, or to inquire about our other services such as house calls, laser therapy, or dental procedures.

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Agressive Cats and How to Deal With Them: A Quick Guide

Agressive Cats and How to Deal With Them: A Quick Guide

Cats rarely show true aggression towards humans: when they do it’s often because they feel afraid or anxious due to an outdoor cat they can smell just out of sight. This article doesn’t fully apply to any cat under a year of age that has only one playmate (their owner!), as those animals are probably just learning and exploring boundaries. A few ways to tell if your cat is being aggressive and not playful is if they’re hissing or growling, as cats play quietly, or if they have a “play face” (mouth half open, back arched, jumping from side to side).

Check Out WebMD’s handy guide on How to Reduce Your Cat’s Rough Play Behaviour:

  • Provide a variety of toys for your cat so you can determine his preferences. In general, cats seem to enjoy batting at small toys, like balls and fake mice. They also like to stalk, chase and pounce on things that move like prey, such as toys with feathers attached to flexible rods that you can dangle and move about. Try getting your cat a Kitty Teaser™ or some other kind of toy that dangles. Please see our article, Cat Toys, to learn more about playing with your cat and choosing the best toys for him.
  • Frequently give your cat new objects to investigate, such as paper bags or cardboard boxes.
  • Twice a day, spend at least ten minutes playing with your cat. During playtime, don’t encourage him to bat at your hands or feet. Instead, direct the play away from you by using a long dangly toy or throwing your cat’s favorite toys. Schedule play sessions to coincide with times when your cat seems most active and playful.
  • If your cat likes to grab your feet as you go up and down the stairs or hide under things and ambush your ankles or legs as you walk by, carry toys with you and toss them ahead of you to redirect his attention. Try to get him to focus on chasing the toys instead of attacking you.
  • Consider adopting another cat as a playmate. If you do, choose a young, playful cat like your current cat.
  • Build an outdoor enclosure for your cat, complete with branches, boxes, shelves and perches for him to navigate. If you can provide a more complex environment for your cat, full of opportunities to hunt insects and chase leaves, your cat will be less motivated to play with you.
  • Consistently give your cat “time-outs” when he plays too roughly. The instant he starts to bite or scratch you, end the game by leaving the room. Don’t attempt to pick up your cat and put him in another room for the time-out as this could provoke more bites.

 

If you have any questions, be sure to stop by our Vancouver veterinary clinic to speak with our knowledgeable vet, or to inquire about our other services such as house calls, laser therapy, or dental procedures.

 

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